Friday, May 5, 2017

I Shall Not Be Moved by Maya Angelou

I just finished reading I Shall Not Be Moved by Maya Angelou. "Our Grandmothers" is beautiful. Another favorite of mine, "They Ask Why," is shorter so I'll put it here.

They Ask Why

A certain person wondered why
a big strong girl like me
wouldn't keep a job
which paid a normal salary.
I took my time to lead her
and to read her every page.
Even minimal people
can't survive on minimal wage.

A certain person wondered why
I wait all week for you.
I didn't have the words
to describe just what you do.
I said you had the motion
of the ocean in your walk,
and when you solve my riddles
you don't even have to talk.


I don't read much literary criticism so I don't know how to critique a poem, but this one (and most of her poetry, honestly) sound like singing to me.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Shelf Control: Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred Owen

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! Fore more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out the introductory post by Lisa of Bookshelf Fantasies, here.

 This week I'm writing about Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred Owen, a selection of war poetry published under Penguin Little Black Classics.

'Tonight he noticed how the women's eyes
Passed from him to the strong men that were whole.'

The true horror of the trenches is brought to life in this selection of poetry from the front line.

How I got it: This was part of the bookstore receipt amount I needed for the discount card.
When I got it: Maybe six months ago.
Why I got it: Little Black Classics have always been tempting for me. They're so small and cheap, the perfect travel companion, and though I don't always enjoy minimalism in book covers, it makes sense for large collections such as this, and where I feel any sort of embellishment would overwhelm the tiny book. But this volume was particularly enticing, since I'd read a snippet from the titular poem in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. That was my favorite letter from that book, so I just had to get this.  

(I'm actually halfway through this volume by now, but just got around to finishing this entry today. Hope it still counts.)

Sunday, April 9, 2017

The Rights of the Reader by Daniel Pennac


(PDF version) via Austin Kleon on Tumblr 

Monday, March 27, 2017

Currently reading one letter from Isa Garcia's Found every morning and it's just... it's so good? Like, she tells me stuff I never knew I needed to hear and I actually feel like she's telling me personally and I thought I would be uncomfortable reading the letters about God but they were super comforting and I was more uncomfortable reading about love and anyway... I love this book and I'm not even halfway through.

Found: Letters on Love, Life, and God by Isa Garcia, illustrated by Crae Achacoso:

Isa Garcia believes that everybody deserves love letters. She wrote these letters in Found for you: the girl who has been feeling a bit lost; the girl who likes to run from pain; the girl who is ready to go; the girl who is a lot of things at one time or another. Isa knows that there are days when you would need to be reminded that you matter, you are not alone, and the world is a far better place with you in it.
In this book, may you find a friend who takes you as you are, a safe space for your secret hopes and fears, and the assurance that no matter where you are in your life right now, you will always be found. 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Shelf Control: Welcome to Night Vale by Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Canor

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! Fore more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out the introductory post by Lisa of Bookshelf Fantasies, here.





Synopsis from Goodreads:
From the creators of the wildly popular Welcome to Night Vale podcast comes an imaginative mystery of appearances and disappearances that is also a poignant look at the ways in which we all struggle to find ourselves...no matter where we live.

Located in a nameless desert somewhere in the great American Southwest, Night Vale is a small town where ghosts, angels, aliens, and government conspiracies are all commonplace parts of everyday life. It is here that the lives of two women, with two mysteries, will converge.

How I got it: I needed a certain amount in accumulated receipts to get a bookstore discount card and I was within P500 ($10, I guess) of the amount and this was the last book I bought for the card.
When I got it: Yesterday.
Why I want to read it: I've been hearing great things about the Welcome to Night Vale podcast for years (and have enjoyed the fanart greatly) but couldn't get into podcasts. More of a visual person, I guess, so I jumped at the chance to join the fandom in a way I was used to. 

WWW Wednesday 17

This meme/link-up is hosted by Taking on a World of Words
What are you currently reading?

Found by Isa Garcia is lovely; I'm savoring it by reading a letter a day. 

What did you recently finish reading?

Some more unusual books (for my usual taste) I read were The Nesting Place by Myquillyn Smith (nonfiction/decorating, It Doesn't Have to be Perfect to be Beautiful), About the Size of It by Warwick Cairns (The Common Sense Approach to Measuring Things), and To Be Or Not To Be by Ryan North (a choose-your-own-adventure Hamlet retelling). 

I also read three Filipino books: Alternative Alamat (reimagined Philippine mythology), Shine by Candy Gourlay, and Don't Tell My Mother by Brigitte Bautista (the first book I've read about LGBT issues and religious issues in a coming-of-age setting).

What do you think you'll read next?
After Found I think I'm going to resume reading Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Shelf Control: A Slight Trick of the Mind by Mitch Cullin

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! Fore more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out the introductory post by Lisa of Bookshelf Fantasies, here.



Synopsis from Goodreads:
Long after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle allowed him to retire to Sussex to take up beekeeping, there seems to be no end of enthusiasm for imagined versions of the life of Sherlock Holmes. There was Michael Chabon's The Final Solution in which "the old man," an 89-year-old beekeeper in Sussex is undoubtedly Holmes. Laurie King, a fine mystery writer, has appropriated Holmes and created a romance between him and young Mary Russell which has lasted through several enjoyable books. And now, nonagenarian Holmes reappears, most appealingly, in Mitch Cullin's A Slight Trick of the Mind. He is frail and forgetful but still observant and capable of shining the bright light of his insight and brilliance on events both past and present.
How I got it: My friend gave it to me in exchange for Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo
When I got it: Earlier today, at lunch
Why I want to read it: Sherlock Holmes stories are always interesting, and his much-praised mind appears to be the focus of this book. 
© Someday this will be a book blog
Maira Gall